Half Marathon Competition

Peer Pressure, Brotherly Competition, and the Dingle Half Marathon

As many of you will know I have recently been training for a half marathon. I’d like to say from the outset that I am not a natural running, feeling much more at home in the swimming pool or sea, nor do I particularly enjoy running. This might lead you to wonder why I would sign up for a half marathon. The answer is simple. My younger brother Mark said he had signed up and slyly dropped a few digs that he would have complete one before me on a Facebook post.

As any older sibling can relate to this sort of call out can not go unanswered. I immediately told him to sign me up, which he did (because I’m still the bossy older brother) before google searching “Best Running Apps”. I wasn’t to be beaten.

Marathon Planning- Fail to prepare, and prepare to fail!

As I mentioned before, I am not a natural runner. I have run two 10k races both over 2 years ago. The first was the Banbridge 10k- a sneaky hilly little circuit that I was reasonably well prepared for. the second the St. Patrick’s day Belfast 10k which I was horrifically under prepared for. Training for the Belfast 10k started 1 week prior to the race. I managed 10k on the treadmill in relatively good time. went back the following day only managing 7k before my calves got a little tight. Sensibly, or so I convinced myself at the time, I decided to stop and stretch. the following 3 days saw me struggle out of chairs, avoid any steps and walk like a pirate with two peg legs. I could just about walk normally 2 days before the race when I went to collect my race pack. Embarrassingly my keenness to get signed up for the race meant that my race number was…. 2. If only I had the same keenness for training. Ultimately I managed the race, setting a relatively slow time of 51mins- narrowly avoiding overrunning my pay and display car park ticket.

Sensibly, or so I convinced myself at the time, I decided to stop and stretch. the following 3 days saw me struggle out of chairs, avoid any steps and walk like a pirate with two peg legs. I could just about walk normally 2 days before the race when I went to collect my race pack. Embarrassingly my keenness to get signed up for the race meant that my race number was…. 2. If only I had the same keenness for training. Ultimately I managed the race, setting a relatively slow time of 51mins- narrowly avoiding overrunning my pay and display car park ticket.

This was 2 years ago and until Mark had signed up for this half marathon I hadn’t run since. Thankfully the Asics app was able to devise a plan for me.

 

Sticking with the half marathon program

I wish I could say that I have followed every training day scheduled in the app, but I haven’t. Having signed up in February the Asics app devised a plan consisting of 111 runs split across 7 different training phases. Each with a different aim. Some designed to improve my pace, others, the distance that I could run.

 

Half marathon goal setting

 

My Ascis App predicts that had I completed all of the above training session that I would run a pace of 8:19 min/mile giving me a target time of 1:48:55. The majority of my recent runs have come in at a slower pace for a shorter distance. the furthest I have run in training has nee 11.5 miles as opposed to the 13.1 miles of a half marathon. My average logged paces to date have been between 8:30 and 8:55 min/miles.

 

Competition

 

I will be running a competition on Facebook- giving away 2 free appointments for the winner and two of their friends. All you have to do to be in with a chance of winning is guess closest to my finishing time and tag a friend. Simples! Enter on Facebook by clicking here!

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